Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This is a copy of the message I sent to peaks via Instagram:


As a multi-year multipass holder I am disgusted with your lack of desire to truly fix the Summit Triple at Attitash. You have spend multiple millions of dollars in VT and NY over the last three years and one of the biggest bane's of existence in your portfolio is the POS pile of scrap metal you call a lift. 5 weeks this season there has been no access to the summit and some of the best terrain in Mount Washington Valley. You are loosing family's by the dozens as this problem remains. We love our hill but will not continue to spend our money at a place that doesn't value their customers.

Response: Thanks for the passionate feedback. We want to assure you that we’re working hard to come up with a good solution for the Summit Triple. Right now the focus is to get it back up and running for this season, while we work on a long term solution.

Ok, is it just me or is the long term solution pretty f$@king evident?

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Northeast Mountain Sports mobile app

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

12:30 UPDATE - We have experienced a temporary power failure. The power company has been contacted and we are working as quickly as possibly to resolve the issue. All lifts on the Attitash side will remain on hold until then. The Kachina lift at Bear Peak is open. Stay tuned to this page for updates.

Another squirrel?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

2/26/19

Tuesday Afternoon Update:
Work continues on the Summit Triple, as our teams continued to rule out the potential causes of the issue with our lift.

Since our last update, our crews have fully drained the remaining lube oil from both the upper and lower gearbox and the planetary gears. With this completed, they have been able to start to get a clearer look inside through the use of small inspection ports and borescope cameras which can be fed into the inner workings of the gears. While these cameras are a great tool that allows them to look inside without having to open everything up completely, they only give access to about 1/3 of the inside of the planetary.

Additionally, specialized rigging arrived early this morning from Mount Snow, that will allow our team to remove the lift cable from the bullwheel to prepare the bullwheel to be lowered if needed. Special equipment was also sourced locally in order to prepare to drop the planetary gear system, which will most likely be done tomorrow. Once that system is on the ground, our teams can start to open it up and get a full look inside at what might be the problem.

In addition to specialized equipment, we anticipate the arrival of a team of specialized lift technicians tomorrow that will be able to add their experience to diagnosing the issue with the lift.

We wish we had more to report at this time, but we still do not know the full cause of the issues this lift is experiencing. Please continue checking back on this blog for the most up-to-date and detailed information on the progress of the repair.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wednesday Afternoon Update: 
Today was all about prepping and removing the outer layers that house the planetary gear set of the Summit Triple.

First up, we removed a smaller plate that gave us access for the first time to the center of the planetary get set. With this removed, we are able to peer right into the very center of the gear set and get a clearer look at an area that has so far been out of reach to us.

As we removed the smaller plate – smaller being a relative term, as the plate weighs 75+ pounds – we noticed a number of metal filings that are certainly not supposed to be there if everything was functioning correctly. [the small plate can be seen in the photo below where Brian is using a screw gun to remove the hex nuts holding it in place] While it’s too early to determine directly where these came from, our hunch is that they came from the bullwheel bearing. The presence of these filings means that we need to continue to remove layers from the planetary gear set to get access to where the bearings are located.

 

image.png.7e6ba2373555beb8fab422202ce2985a.png

 

Once this was determined, we set to work preparing the next layer for removal. This next layer is a massive bowl-shaped piece of half-inch steel, weighing roughly 300+ pounds, that makes up the protective covering of the planetary gears. In the picture below, you will see we’ve inserted four threaded rods into the area above the plate. These will be used to slowly lower the plate and finally expose the full workings of the planetary gears. From there, we’re hoping to have a clearer look at the problem, or at the very least confirmation that we need to dive deeper into the workings.

image.png.447c40974125e0b28d583f30ff6cab4e.png

 
We’ll start lowering this larger plate first thing in the morning and will be sure to report back with our findings here on the blog.
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UPDATED 2/28/19

Afternoon update:
Another day of progress here on The Summit Triple, as our crews were able to fully drop the bottom plate to expose the entirety of the planetary gear system.

image.thumb.png.f7cd778d70a0e169785439cada14e491.png

Our guys started up first thing this morning with the laborious process of lowering the bottom plate on the planetary gear system. Since this plate weighs hundreds of pounds, it was critical we take our time and accomplish this safely. Once the bottom plate was removed, we finally had our first clear look into the planetary system, and we saw…nothing. While this sounds anticlimactic, it allows up to rule out the planetary system as the cause of the problem.

image.png.76cbf4bd20a17d4e026a3b120e055c19.png

So, you may be asking, what’s next? Well, since we were able to rule out the planetary system, we now know that the issue is closer to the very inner workings of the bullwheel. Now that we know the planetary is not the issue, we will begin preparations to drop the bullwheel, where we believe we will find the root of the problem in the main bearing of the bullwheel.

These preparations are going to take time, but thanks to some specialized rigging we got from the lift maintenance team at Mount Snow, this will go a lot easier. First up, we need to rig the lift cable to be removed from the bullwheel. This is a process that will take at least a full day of rigging, planning and prep. Once the cable is removed, we will continue rigging the bullwheel in preparation for lowering it. This involves another full day of work, including removing the emergency breaking system on the lift. Right now, we anticipate being able to drop the bullwheel this weekend if all goes to plan.

While we’re making progress, we are still a ways out from a fix for The Summit Triple. As you can probably infer, we won’t have the lift for this coming weekend, and while we don’t currently have a timeline for when this might reopen, we want to assure you that we are doing everything possible to get this lift back up and running.

We thank you for your patience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Conway Daily Sun has a fairly lengthy article on the Triple. John Lowell basically says "don't blame me, it's a Peak Resorts decision." Short answer is there almost certainy won't be a new lift next year. And Peak Resorts considers this type of investment to be something that must be planned several years in advance. There is not much hope.

Quote

Asked if there are plans to replace the Summit Triple with a high-speed detachable lift, given the CTEC’s slowness even when it is running properly, Lowell said replacement has been discussed for many years but that ultimately it is a decision Peak Resorts of Wildwood, Mo. — owner of Attitash and Wildcat, among many other ski areas — will make one way or the other.

“There’s nothing concrete on the table right now to replace that lift … There are two major lift companies still in existence (Poma and Doppelmayr) and both are backed up in manufacturing,” Lowell said.

He said there is probably a two-year wait for lifts right now. “So, even if that were a decision, it couldn’t possibly happen for next season,” he said.

“Peak Resorts is a publicly held company, governed by a board of directors, and they’re the folks who make those decisions,” said Lowell, who started out as general manager of the Grand Summit Hotel at Attitash in 2002 and became managing director of the entire resort in 2006.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A two year wait for lifts. That's why corporate consolidation sucks. I wonder how many more lifts there would be if there were 3-4 lift manufacturers, and if any ski areas had to shut down becouse the lift manufactures did not want to cheapen there lifts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/1/2019 at 6:00 PM, Benski said:

A two year wait for lifts. That's why corporate consolidation sucks. I wonder how many more lifts there would be if there were 3-4 lift manufacturers, and if any ski areas had to shut down becouse the lift manufactures did not want to cheapen there lifts.

I don't buy the wait.  Alterra just announced two new lifts going in for next season at their resorts.  It doesn't sound like a full install season to me coming up.  Think Peaks is making excuses.  Now, there could be an upcharge for a one year install timeline.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A week and a half in. They still don't know what is wrong and continue to disassemble the lift.

Quote

3/1/19

Afternoon Update:
Today was all about prepping and rigging to get ready to pull the cable off of the bullwheel, so that we can drop the bullwheel and get to the heart of the problem.

Today, our team attached the plate clamps to the lift cable that will allow us to tie the cable off to supports on the bottom of the lift and take the tension off of the bullwheel.

 

Once we are sure the cable is secured and the tension is off of the bullwheel, we can move the entire lift carriage forward and the cable should simply slide off the back of the bullwheel. The carriage is essentially the entire room you see above the lift’s bottom station and includes the motor, drive, and other key components of the lift. This carriage can move forward and backwards using hydraulics to keep the correct amount of tension on the line while the lift is in operation.

 

 

While part of the team has been prepping the cable, the rest of them have been busy at work removing the myriad of sensors, switches, and safety systems that are all positioned on the bullwheel.

 

These all must be removed before the bullwheel can be lowered. These systems include, the emergency braking system, the auto-rollback emergency braking system, the plane monitoring system, and the carriage position system. Once these are all removed, we’ll be able to start to drop the bullwheel. 

 

 

These preparations took the majority of today and will continue through at least Saturday and maybe even into Sunday morning. Once we get the cable off, and the bullwheel removed, we believe we will be able to identify which bearing is having the issue and have the correct part flown in overnight.

While this may seem like things are moving along slowly to some of you, this job is something that normally takes months of planning and execution to pull off, even during ideal conditions in the summer months. This is exactly why we went ahead and rebuilt this entire system in the summer of 2014, which should have meant it would be all set for another 15+ years. Obviously some piece failed way before the end of its usable life, and we’re going to be interested to figure out how and why it did to prevent this from happening on this lift, as well as other lifts by this manufacturer.

The amount of work, planning, and preparation that our team has been able to accomplish over the past five days would normally be a done over at least three weeks or more, and we’re incredibly proud of the work they’ve been able to accomplish. Once this project is done, I’d encourage you to buy these guys a round if you see them in the lodge.

We’ll be sure to keep you all updated on the progress, so please keep checking back on this blog.

3/2/19

Afternoon Update:
Work continues on the process of rigging the cable in preparation to remove it from the bullwheel, and readying the bullwheel to be dropped.

Today, our crew once again focused on rigging the cable to be removed from the bullwheel tomorrow. In order to do this, they are using clamps to secure the cable to the base of the lift station, so that we can be sure the cable won’t move when we slide the lift carriage forward and take the tension off the bullwheel.

 

This is a process we double, triple, and quadruple check, as the cable and all the chairs that hang from it weigh 62,000+ lbs. and we only have one chance to get this right.

 

While part of the crew is working on the cable rigging, the rest of them have been removing the variety of sensors and safety mechanisms that we mentioned in yesterday’s blog. These include items such as the rollback protection devices, the plane monitoring system, and the emergency brakes.

 

The emergency brakes alone are a massive undertaking, as they consist of four separate brake systems, each weighing 200+ lbs. [See image for scale and size.] In addition to all these systems, each and every wire, sensor, and switch that controls them needs to be removed, tagged, and properly stored, so that we can easily reassemble them when it comes time.

 
 

 

As for tomorrow’s plans, we’ll be running final tests to be sure the cable is properly secured and then hope to move the lift carriage forward to remove the cable from the bullwheel. Tomorrow will also mark the arrival of one the top Kissling Gearbox, Planetary Gearbox Specialists in the country, who is just finishing up a job in California, and flying our way today. It will be a huge help to have his expertise on this project, as he has done this kind of job hundreds of times. We’re looking forward to having another seasoned set of eyes on site, as well as his lifetime of knowledge with the inner workings of these gear systems.

Please check back tomorrow for another status update.

3/3/19

Afternoon Update:
Today was all about putting the final touches on everything, ahead of dropping the lift cable tomorrow, as well as prepping the upper gearbox for removal. 

This morning our crews double and triple checked their rigging on the main lift cable in preparation for removing it from the bullwheel. We debated dropping the cable at the end of the day today, but decided to save it for first thing tomorrow morning, so that we can be around and monitor it. It’s interesting, it takes days to prep for the cable drop, but the actual process of dropping the cable should take 10 minutes at the most. 

While the final cable checks were occurring, the last of the sensors, switches, and the massive emergency brakes were removed from above the bullwheel to ready it to be dropped in the future, if need be. 

 

 

At the same time, our crews were working up inside of the lift preparing the upper gearbox for removal. This included removing the lubrication systems and sensors from the upper gearbox. This process went smoothly, and we expect to be able to raise this gearbox tomorrow.Once we have removed the upper gearbox, we’ll have our first real look into the coupling that attaches the upper gearbox to the planetary gearbox. Hopefully this will give us a better view of the problem, so that we can begin to fix it. 

Today also marked the arrival of several specialists, including rigging specialists from Southern New Hampshire, and the gearbox specialist out of Connecticut. Their arrival onsite is perfectly timed, as all the work we’ve been doing so far has been in preparation for the work these technicians specialize in.

 

  We’ll have a status and planning meeting in the morning with these technicians and our onsite crew to get everyone up to speed and talk through the best plan of attack for the next few days. After that, it’s off to work! 

 

Thanks again for your patience through this tough time. 

3/4/19

Morning Update:

Today marks the arrival of the two specialists, Pfister Mountain Services, and ARTEC, the gearbox specialist out of Connecticut. Their arrival onsite is perfectly timed, as all the work we’ve been doing so far has been in preparation for the work these technicians specialize in. We are having a status and planning meeting in the morning with these technicians and our onsite crew to get everyone up to speed and talk through the best plan of attack for the next few days. After that, it’s off to work!

Thanks again for your patience through this tough time.

UPDATED 3/5/19

Afternoon Update:
There’s a flurry of activity at the bottom of the Summit Triple today.

Yesterday, we all sat down as a team with the new technicians we have onsite and crafted a plan of attack for the rest of this project. Once the planning session was over, we returned to the lift and were able to drop the planetary gear set and bring it into our heated shop for closer inspection. Now that it’s inside, we can give it a closer look for any uneven wear or other potential issues.

Today, we’re turning our focus onto the bullwheel and the upper gear box. We’ve determined that we do in fact need to lower the bullwheel and the planetary housing, so half of our crew will focus their efforts today on preparing to drop this 8,000+ lbs. piece. Once we have the bullwheel and planetary housing out, we’ll be able to inspect the lower bearing on the coupling, which we believe could be the cause of the lift issue.

During this time, the other half of the crew has been up on the top of the lift preparing to pull the upper gearbox, which is now ready to be lowered to the ground. In order to accomplish this, we’ve removed the roof of the lift terminal and the main door, so that we can utilize an overhead I-beam to lift and move the 5,000 lbs. gearbox and lower to the ground outside of the lift. Now that the gearbox is out, we’ll be able to get a look at the upper bearing on the coupling, which could also be the cause of the lift issue.

As with dropping the cable, dropping the bullwheel and pulling the upper gearbox are projects that require a lot of planning and preparation, but when ready, happen fairly quickly.

Please stay tuned for further updates.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Skipped Attitash Saturday.  That lift is going to run SWEET come April, I just know it (sarcasm)

I also must say while I generally don't care how the sausage is made, Mr Lowell's play by play is great, I've really been enjoying the serial.  Love the transparency (sincerity)

 

Edited by Skier X

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll have done just one day at Attitash (in December... where I spent the morning at Wildcat) this year as a result of this triple nonsense.

While I still have a pass, I typically bring 2+ people with me on my Wildcat/Attitash days who buy tickets.

I'm sure I'm not alone. This has gotta be hurting them a lot.

Edited by Jully

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skipped Attitash Saturday.  That lift is going to run SWEET come April, I just know it (sarcasm)
I also must say while I generally don't care how the sausage is made, Mr Lowell's play by play is great, I've really been enjoying the serial.  Love the transparency (sincerity)
 
Everyone appreciates honesty but really at this point there is only one thing that can be said which would saciate the majority of loyalists, "we are getting a new summit chair!"

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe Mr Lowell wants a new lift as well so he is being transparent to get people riled up so Peaks notices the customer outrage and replaces it. He knows he and Attitash (well all of NH) are the red headed step child of Peaks.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My apologies to people who read multiple ski forums, I'm just gonna paste my same comments here that I've said elsewhere since there is a lot of good conversation going on about this.....  

The problem and decision-making is bigger than just this one lift. Peaks' ownership offers options, but it also creates problems. This season Wildcat has been very quick to preemptively shut down for the day due to cold, wind, etc. It's fair decision making, but it's pretty obvious that they are quick(er) to make that call because they can offer a product nearby at Attitash. Likewise, Attitash can make excuses for it's summit lift not running since they can offer a summit option up the road at Wildcat. BUT....you can't have it both ways. They need to solve Attitash or get more aggressive with Wildcat operations. Customers in MWV are very forgiving but they won't tolerate getting bounced around forever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Puck it said:

Cannonball Quad is having a squirrel incident this week.

But at least there is still summit access...they've been running the tram in response.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Work continues as we send out the gearbox for special testing.

Work has been continuing here at the Summit Triple, as we were able to fully remove the upper gearbox on Wednesday and bring it into our shop at Attitash for closer inspection. Finding nothing out of the ordinary that we could see, we have sent the gearbox down to Artec in Connecticut, who will be able to run it through some highly advanced computerized testing. The gearbox left here at 3 a.m. Thursday and arrived at Artec at 8 a.m. yesterday and is already in the midst of testing.

The next step will be lowering the bullwheel and planetary housing, as well as the drive shaft and upper and lower bearings. Once we have all of this out, we will also be sending it down to Connecticut for further testing.

In the meantime, two new bullwheel bearings are being flown in from Switzerland and will be ready to be installed once the upper gearbox and planetary gears come back from Artec, most likely on Thursday, but potentially earlier if possible. We’re hoping to hear more about the preliminary testing results soon and will be sure to keep you posted.  

Once everything is back onsite, our crews will go ahead and begin to reassemble the lift.

As you can probably infer, we will not have the Summit Triple for the coming weekend, but hopefully we are moving ever closer to seeing it spin once again. Thank you all for your patience and kind words.

Yes sir, we're looking at another week before reassembly can start. And they still don't know what the problem is. Fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/8/2019 at 2:57 PM, SkiingInABlueDream said:

I'm curious about the machinery and process it takes to unloop the rope from the bullwheel while still maintaining line tension.

 

I am way more curious why they are not ordering a new lift ?????

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You and everyone else.

Money. Peak Resorts will pinch a nickel until it shits. Even when they buy something new, it is on interest-only payments on subprime terms. They are a pyramid of toxic debt.


Sent from my iPhone using Northeast Mountain Sports

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At what point do they just decide to shut the lift down for the season?
They will probably close Tash Sunday 3/31 or maybe open for 1 final wknd in April but the clock is ticking on the season for them.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


Mobile Apps available!

Please try our mobile apps for iOS and Android

×
×
  • Create New...